The ultimate GIPF board


The Ultimate GIPF Board.

I'm a big fan of kris Burm's GIPF series (http://www.gipf.com/). I love the games, the pieces, and the design. As part of my quest to condense my game collection down as much as possible, I attempted to design a board that could play all the GIPF series games. The board works with dvonn, gipf, tzaar, yinsh, lyngk, and zertz (although zertz doesn't really need a board, so this is cheating a bit). The pieces for punct are a bit too unusual so it doesn't work with that one.

You can get a bandana print of the board from me at Printer Studio: http://www.printerstudio.com/sell/mtrossdesign.
This gives me a few bucks and I have tested the quality of the print and material. The board 22 by 22 inches. The cloth print is on a polyester that is really soft, sturdy, and doesn't wrinkle (The material is really great, I was very impressed the first time I received the print from them). It's not the thickest material though so I've found its best to play on a flat surface. Although, when confronted with an uneven surface I just layer it with some of the other cloth boards I have and that seems to do the trick.

You can also download the board for personal use below (just click the image). My only ask is that you don't post the original file elsewhere and instead post a link directing people back to my site.

The Ultimate Gipf board design:
 
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-c7VPfP9PxhTTJfOS1DWjRSemM/view?usp=sharing
v.7

Design Notes:
Version 7 - Added Lyngk Board
 
The big challenge when designing this board was to make the boundaries of each board distinct enough to identify when playing a specific game, but not too distracting when playing the others. One of the beautiful things about many of Kris Burm's game designs is that the pieces themselves determine the movement possibilities such that as pieces are moved the number of possible future moves decrease. This means that the games are always moving towards a conclusion. As far as designing a board that encompasses many of his games, this means that it is only necessary to design something that helps designate the starting spaces for setup (as well as still helping to indicate the number of empty spaces between pieces as a game progresses). The pieces themselves from that point on can help differentiate one game board from another.

The Gipf board: Picture coming soon


The DVONN board:


The large dotted circles indicate the placement for the DVONN pieces.


The TZAAR board:


The TZAAR board is indicated by the light blue hexagon and the larger dots. As the center space is not played on during the game it is surrounded by a darker grey color to distinguish it from other spaces.

The Yinsh board:

Yinsh is played on all of the dots. The only locations not playable in Yinsh are the two most lateral dotted circles (used for Dvonn). There are also three circular indications on each players side of the board to place scoring rings.


The Lyngk board: Picture coming as soon as my preorder for the game shows up.


Matthew T Ross - April 1st 2017

4 comments:

  1. This is a wonderful design. Are you considering updating it to cover the 7th game in the GIPF Project - Lyngk - which was released this month? If I'm not mistaken adding a triangle in the centre of each outer-edge of the Dark-Blue Hexagon (Zertz) would suffice - but you're the expert!

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    1. Hi Tom!
      I'm really happy you like the design. Yeah, as soon as Lyngk was announced I started working on modifying the board. I got a little sidetracked with other projects, but I should have the new one uploaded within a week. I'll be excited to hear what you think about it.

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    2. Not as excited as I will be to see it! Lyngk arrived today, so might get a game in this evening!

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  2. Thanks for making this. This not only exceeded my needs but also made me aware of the existence of Lyngk.

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